Frequently Asked Questions

Your first port of call for the answers to all your questions.

The GenderGP FAQs Hub

Welcome to our Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page, designed to provide clear and comprehensive answers to common enquiries about our inclusive healthcare services, prescriptions, and your gender-affirming journey. If you can’t find the answer you’re looking for, please contact our team here.

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About Transition
About the Service
Counselling
Information for GPs
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Pharmacy and Prescriptions

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GenderGP Global FAQs
UK Service Provision FAQs
EU/EEA Service Provision FAQs
Irish Service Provision FAQs
Norwegian Service Provision FAQs
Swedish Service Provision FAQs
Finnish Service Provision FAQs
American Service Provision FAQs
Australian Service Provision FAQs
Electronic Prescription FAQs

About Transition – FAQs

What is Gender Dysphoria?

Gender dysphoria is the term used to describe the sense of discomfort experienced by people who do not identify with the gender they were assigned at birth. The discomfort may be constant or sporadic and it may vary in terms of severity.

What causes someone to be trans?

We are not absolutely sure what causes someone to be trans, and it is probably a variety of factors combined. We do understand that it is not something that can be forced on someone, or something that someone can choose to be. It is not something that happens because of childhood experiences and it is not a personal choice. It is inherent, in the same way as sexuality or eye colour.

Is there a way of diagnosing someone as trans?

As it is a subjective experience, the only person that can actually know whether or not they are trans is the person living with feelings of gender incongruence (the feeling that one’s gender does not align with the one they were assigned at birth). There is no psychological test, blood test or medical scan. It is not something someone chooses to be, and it is certainly not a mental disorder.

Why don’t GPs treat trans patients?

There are many reasons why GPs do not feel able to treat trans patients. These can vary from reasons related to prejudice or religion, to a general belief that they lack the knowledge to do so, and a lack of training resources available. Prejudice or personal belief should never be accepted as a valid reason not to treat a patient, whatever their medical needs. Lack of specialist knowledge is also becoming less accepted as an argument against helping trans patients. We are seeing more GPs learning about the subject and as their knowledge and confidence increases, then they will feel more comfortable in helping their patients better, if not directly then with the support of a gender specialist.

Do I need hormones to transition?

Everyone has a different perspective on what they want to achieve in terms of their transition. For some, social transition, which involves presenting themselves in line with the gender with which they identify, is sufficient. For others, looking for physical changes, hormone therapy is enough to give them the inner peace that is missing. For others, surgery is their desired route.

What do I need to start hormone therapy?

Hormone treatment can be started once you have gone through things and worked out the best and safest route for you to take. You may already know this is the right time, and that it is safe, or you may need a doctor or some support to help you with this.

Where can I get a diagnosis of gender dysphoria?

While a GP is able to provide this, not many GPs feel that they have the necessary knowledge or training to ‘diagnose’. Much more work is needed in this area. Other people who can help are local endocrinologists, GPs with a special interest or other gender specialists. You can also get a diagnosis through a Gender Identity Clinic (GIC) but the waiting lists can be very long. Counsellors and psychologists can all give you a diagnosis if that is what you require to achieve your goals.

What is self-medding?

Self-medding is the term used to describe the process whereby a trans individual carries out their own research via trans forums and support groups to try to understand what levels of hormones might be right for their needs. The individual then obtains the “medication” (often without a prescription) and begins to follow a treatment regime. This approach is often not monitored and the medication is often questionable which can carry worrying negative health implications.

Why do people self-medicate?

Many people have been forced to start treatment on their own due to long waiting times and a struggle to access the right healthcare regime for them.

I want to stop self-medicating, what should I do?

If you are obtaining your medication in this way, GenderGP can swap you onto safe prescription medication as well as arranging to have your bloods monitored to check your hormone levels are safe.

Will I be penalised if I get private care?

The British Medical Association policy states: “Patients who are entitled to NHS funded treatment may opt into or out of NHS care at any stage. Patients who have had private consultation for investigations and diagnosis may transfer to the NHS for any subsequent treatment. They should be placed directly on the waiting list at the same position as if their original consultation had been within the NHS.”

I have other health problems, does this mean I can’t have hormone treatment?

A history of liver, heart or blood clotting problems, in you or your family, does not preclude you from accessing hormones but it does mean that your case may require additional monitoring.

Do you treat children and adolescents?

We use the medical definition of child which means prepubertal. Before the onset of puberty children do not require medical treatment and any transition should be managed socially (allowing the child to dress and identify as they wish). Medical treatment other than belief and support is not needed until puberty starts.

At what age do you begin treatment?

We do not classify according to age but rather in line with the onset of puberty. Once an adolescent has reached Tanner stage 2 (the starting phase of puberty), we can work with the adolescent and parent or guardian to support any child suffering with gender dysphoria.

What treatments do you offer to younger people?

Each individual is considered on a case by case basis. Treatments available to adolescents, in line with international best practices, are puberty blocking medication and when indicated, gender affirming hormones.

Are puberty blockers reversible?

Medication to stop puberty is totally reversible. Please see our myth buster for more information.

Are cross sex hormones reversible?

No. Prescribing these hormones has long-lasting and irreversible implications, however these changes do not occur overnight. Gender affirming hormones are classed as being partially reversible. No doctor would ever choose to actively prescribe such medication unless it was in the best interest of the patient.

About the Service – FAQs

How much does the service cost?

Please see our fees page for a breakdown of fees.

How long does the process take?

This varies with what you are trying to achieve. If you are sure of your gender and the steps you wish to take, have access to blood tests and support, then the process can take as little as four weeks.

I am having regular counselling, do I still need to pay for regular follow up sessions as well?

We just need to know that everything is going well for you and that you are happy and safe. If your counsellor is happy to give us a report to say that then that is all we require.

Does a family member have to be involved in my treatment plan?

We want everyone to be supported in their gender journey, some have more support than others. If you don’t have someone close to you to help then we will be there to support you. Not having someone who understands this is not a reason why we would not give you care.

How often do my bloods need to be tested?

Some people like to have their bloods measured very closely while we get to the dose that is right for them. For some this happens quickly and bloods can then be monitored every three months or sometimes less if everything is very stable.

What is included in the monthly subscription?

Your monthly subscription fee covers the cost of any ongoing support and advice we provide to you or your GP, or your specialist. It covers the monitoring of your blood results and your prescription creation (NB: this does not include the medication which is purchased separately), as well as all advice and information from the team.

What is an IGS? Why is it necessary?

IGS is short for Information Gathering Session, which is carried out with our therapy team, either in person or over video. The IGS enables us to meet you ‘face to face’ and learn more about your situation and how we might be able to help. The information is shared both ways, you tell us about you and we tell you about us.

I don’t need or want counselling, is it obligatory?

Counselling in the traditional sense of the word is not obligatory with GenderGP. Counselling sessions are available with our excellent team of therapists and may people find it to be hugely beneficial. However, it is up to you to decide what psychological support you need. We do require you to have a follow up session every so often so that we can see how you are doing and ensure we have regular contact outside of email conversations. These are carried out by video consultation, or can be done in person if you prefer.

Why do I need a follow up session?

These appointments provide an opportunity to see what physical and psychological changes service users might be experiencing and to see if there is any help, advice or sign posting we can offer to enhance their transition and progress. We want the best for you and to keep an eye on how things are going.

Do I need a diagnosis to access hormone therapy?

At GenderGP we do not ‘diagnose’, as we feel it is disrespectful to your identity. You are the expert in your gender experience. Instead, what we do is take each of our service users through our Appraisal Pathway which includes getting to know you, taking a thorough history and exploring your relationship with gender to ensure we are able to provide you with the best possible recommendations for your treatment. Whether that is being provided via GenderGP or your directly through your doctor. If you want a formal diagnosis, however, then we can provide you with a confirmation of that.

Do I have to live in a particular role to get treatment through GenderGP?

People should be allowed to express themselves in a way that makes them feel most comfortable, and to transition as slowly or quickly as is medically safe. They shouldn’t have to dress in a particular way or live in a way that makes them feel uncomfortable in order to gain the correct treatment. This is not something we enforce at GenderGP.

Why do I need to have my bloods tested?

Regular blood testing enables us to monitor your hormone levels to ensure you are within the required range for the gender with which you identify.

Do you work at the weekend?

Our core team works from 0800-1800 Monday to Friday with a reduced service operating at weekends. This allows us to work closely with the opening times of our online pharmacy, Clear Chemist and our partner laboratory: The Doctors Laboratory.

Is Portal still working?

Yes! Your account in Portal is still live but we have disabled the messaging function as it was causing unnecessary delays to your care. The next exciting phase is to integrate the Help Centre with Portal in order to bring everything back into one place. For the time being, please keep copies of the letters and messages we send you.

Why can't I log into my Portal account?

We are currently working behind the scenes on integrating our Help Centre with the GenderGP Portal, so that you can access all of your care in one place. Until this exciting phase is complete and fully tested, access to Portal will be limited. You can still access your account via links in your previous communications from GenderGP.

Can I access my old messages/records?

Yes. All of your old messages and records are accessible via your Portal account if you had one. If not then they will be in your email inbox.

How long does it take to process a prescription?

Please allow 48 working hours for prescription requests to be processed.

My prescription has been sent to Clear Chemist but I haven't heard from them, is there a delay?

Once your medication has been approved by the doctor at GenderGP, a prescription is sent to Clear Chemist who will usually contact you the next working day to let you know your medication is ready for purchase. Please do not order medication until we have told you that we have sent the prescription to Clear Chemist. Find out more about how the process works by visiting our Help Centre.

Can I get a paper prescription?

Yes you can, but it is best to check with your local pharmacy that they are comfortable in receiving private prescriptions from EU doctors for gender-related medication. Many pharmacies are anxious and ill-informed which can lead to embarrassing refusals. Most patients find it easier and cheaper to use our online pharmacy. There is a £12 surcharge for a paper prescription to cover our added processing costs.

Can I switch to a treatment summary with my GP after I have already started treatment privately?

Yes of course, we love working with GPs and are always grateful for their help. On your next prescription request, simply choose the ‘Treatment Summary’ option.

Can I speak to someone?

Ours is a digital service and we operate using our Help Centre and email notifications. However, if you wish to book an appointment with a member of the team you can do so by clicking on the relevant section here.

Do you do shared care?

To find out more about how we can work with your doctor visit our dedicated page.

What should I do if I have an emergency?

We do not operate an emergency service. If you feel you have a medical emergency please contact your local emergency services by dialling 999. If you feel that your medication is not right and you are waiting for a response from a member of the team, it is quite safe to stop taking your medication until you have heard back from us.

How do I make a complaint?

If you are unhappy with your experience, and you would like to make a formal complaint, please send us a message via the Help Centre and it will be passed to the complaints department. You are, at any time, free to leave our service and find care elsewhere, we will always provide you with a summary for your next provider and you are welcome to return at any time.

Who is responding to my questions/sending me letters?

We have a full multidisciplinary team of people looking after your care. Your requests are always directed to the best team member, depending on the nature of your query.

My doctor wants to know the name and GMC number of the doctor who is managing my care through GenderGP.

Due to the challenges faced by UK doctors keen to support transgender patients, all of our doctors are based outside of the UK. The GMC is a regulatory body and as such their remit does not cover GenderGP doctors. Each GenderGP doctor is carefully selected on the basis of their qualifications and gender affirmative approach. In line with GenderGP policy, each doctor adheres to best practice outlines in the guidelines that can be found here.

Do you have to ‘pass a test’ to qualify for treatment via GenderGP?

We do not ‘test’ our service users to see whether they are trans, because only they know the answer to that. Instead we take our service users through our Appraisal Pathway. This ensures we have all the information we need about them, to keep them safe, and that they have enough information about the process and the care available through GenderGP, to make an informed decision. Find out more.

Counselling – FAQs

Why should I seek counselling?

Counselling is a safe and confidential environment in which you are free to explore the issues that may be troubling you. It is a professional friendship which will help you to find the language you need to talk about your feelings and which will give you a greater understanding of your situation, empowering you to make the choices that matter.

What is different about GenderGP’s counselling team?

While some counsellors may claim to be experienced in helping with feelings surrounding gender, many are very new to this area. GenderGP’s specialist gender counselling team is headed up by a trans woman and the team has been supporting gender expansive people and their loved ones for the past five years.

The volume of clients with whom they have interacted during this time makes them the most experienced specialist gender counselling team in the UK.

All of our counsellors are qualified and registered with the BACP or equivalent, and work to the highest standards. They have regular supervision outside of GenderGP and are bound to the counselling ethical framework.

Furthermore, the specialist gender counselling team are heavily involved in advocacy work and actively seek out the trans community, frequently attending events and support groups.

I know who I am, how can counselling benefit me?

Knowing who we are and understanding our gender identity is only the beginning for many transgender people. Creating a pathway and a safe environment to explore their identity fully, without prejudice, can be a challenge.

Specialist gender counselling is the perfect place to start this exploration. Gender affirmation is a journey and having a counsellor in your back pocket to help when the ride gets a little bumpy can make all the difference. Counselling is not there to tell you who you are, it’s there to support you, whatever your gender identity, and to offer emotional support and exploration.

I am worried you will try to talk me out of my feelings in relation to my gender

Good counsellors, who understand gender, are only there to help you to discover your true identity, not to convince you to be something you are not. If you have questions, our team of specialist gender counsellors can help you to find the answers. The counselling team acts as a professional sounding board, someone completely unbiased and impartial with whom you can share your deepest darkest secrets, without being judged.

What ages do you support?

Everyone! We all need support at different stages in our lives, this is no different if you are questioning your gender. Age should never be a barrier to accessing counselling, so at GenderGP we help people of all ages.

Do you offer support for parents?

Yes! Experience has shown us that while many parents may be accepting and supportive of their child, whatever their age, helping their child to safely navigate their gender journey can be challenging at times. Being able to talk through their thoughts, fears and even prejudices, in a non judgemental environment, can be a hugely positive step for everyone involved.

What if I change my mind?

Gender is a journey which is personal to every individual. Changing your mind suggests going backwards but change is always a movement forward. The same can also apply to someone’s relationship with their gender, it keeps moving forward. We can change the road, or the direction we are on, but it is not about going backwards. No matter how you are feeling, counselling can help you to make sense of your situation.

Can you talk me - or my child - out of being trans?

No, we can’t and we would never try to talk you out of accepting your gender identity, but we can help you to come to terms with it. Our gender identity is not a choice, it is inherent in who we are.

Do I need to have a session with a counsellor to access medication?

Counselling is not mandatory with GenderGP, though we do feel everyone – trans or cis – can benefit from support! We do ask all service users to take part in an Information Gathering Session (IGS) which is carried out by a member of the counselling team, and this is mandatory.

How many sessions would I need to have with you to feel the benefits?

It is entirely up to you. The amount of sessions is not fixed, many people enter counselling for three or four sessions, others continue for months. It all depends on how you experience the process and if you are finding it beneficial. Working with the right counsellor is really important and can have a big impact on your experience, which is why we have a team for you to choose from.

Does online counselling work?

Emphatically yes! Online counselling does work. Counselling is a commitment made by two people to be there at the same time each week. Travelling can make that commitment difficult for the client and they can falter if logistics prove too challenging. Video calling means all they need to do is log on. The fact that they are also surrounded by their own things, in the comfort of their own home, can make them feel at ease, adding to the therapy experience.

How much does a session cost?

The standard rate is £60 per session. If you are struggling to afford this, speak to our counsellors who may be able to work out an individual plan which fits within your budget.

How long do sessions last?

Sessions are a standard 50 minutes in length.

What happens if I miss a session?

We ask that 24 hours notice be given if you are unable to make your session, in this event a full refund will be given. If you are not able to cancel within this timeframe, we will be unable to rebook your slot and as such payment may be required.

How do I book a counselling session?

You can book a session by clicking on the links which can be found on the counselling page. We have listed all of our counsellors individually, so just choose the one you would like to speak to and click on the link.

What if I don’t like my counsellor?

A massive 80% of the success rate of your counselling session can be attributed to the connection you have with your therapist. We have a diverse team which can be found here. Have a look and see who you feel might be a good fit for your particular needs. If you don’t feel the match is quite right, you are free to try another member of the team.

Information for GPs – FAQs

Should GPs collaborate with gender specialists if they lack knowledge in this area?

The NHS constitution gives patients the rights to access certain services by NHS bodies within maximum waiting times, or for the NHS to take all reasonable steps to offer a range of suitable alternative providers if this is not possible.

The Specialised Services Circular 1620: ‘Guidance for GPs, other clinicians and health professionals on the care of gender variant people’ states that, ‘GPs are usually at the centre of treatment for trans people, often in a shared care arrangement with other clinicians. GPs may prescribe hormones and make referrals to other clinicians or services, depending on the needs of the particular service user. Sometimes a GP has, or may develop, a special interest in gender treatment and may be able to initiate treatment, making such local referrals as necessary. Otherwise referrals may be made to a specialist Gender Identity Clinic (GIC) where there are multidisciplinary teams of professionals. Private treatment with a gender specialist may be preferred by the service user.’

What are the benefits of GP / Specialist Collaboration?

Collaboration between gender specialists and the patient’s GP has many benefits:

  1. The patient will be able to access timely and safe healthcare for their gender identity while waiting for access to NHS services which have very long waiting lists.
  2. The patient will be able to reduce their own personal risks by eliminating the need to purchase medication from unregulated sources without proper monitoring.
  3. It supports their GP in prescribing and performing and analysing blood tests until treatment that should ordinarily be available to them on the NHS becomes available, but under specialist supervision.
  4. There is a two-way sharing of the patient’s medical history which leads to safer and more comprehensive care and better outcomes.
  5. Once a diagnosis has been established the GP will be advised on which blood tests are necessary to safely monitor the treatment and medication, and at what intervals they need to be performed.

The NHS Specialised Services Circular 1620 dated 22 April 2016 confirms that there is extensive clinical experience of the use of the medications used in the treatment of gender dysphoria, which provides evidence of tolerability and safety comparable with their use for approved indications.

Why is it said that GPs lack understanding in this area?

In 2016 the Women and Equalities Commission found that ‘The NHS is failing in its legal duty under the Equality Act 2010. Trans people have significant problems in using general NHS services – often because of lack of knowledge and understanding by staff. GPs in particular often lack an understanding of trans identities, the diagnosis of gender dysphoria, and their own role in prescribing hormone treatment.’

What has changed since the Women and equalities Report?

Since the 2016 report, it seems that many GPs have undertaken personal and professional education to increase their knowledge and skills in this area of healthcare. At GenderGP we have seen a steady increase in GPs willing to prescribe and monitor under our guidance. This makes healthcare for trans people much more affordable and accessible, while they wait for NHS services to step in.

What advice is there for GPs who are asked to prescribe and carry out blood tests for their patients?

In January 2018, NHS England published advice to GPs on ‘Primary Care Responsibilities In Regard To Requests by Private On-Line Medical Service Providers to Prescribe Hormone Treatments for Transgender People.’

‘A number of trans and non-binary individuals access private on-line medical services, often because of long waiting lists into an NHS-commissioned Gender Identity Clinic. The online provider may make a diagnosis of gender dysphoria through remote contact with the patient and in such cases a private prescription may be issued, or the patient’s GP will be asked to issue a NHS prescription. Either way, it is likely that the patient’s GP will be asked by the online provider to assume responsibility for monitoring and testing and for passing the results of the monitoring and testing to the private on-line service.

‘A number of GP practice staff have asked NHS England to provide advice on the responsibilities upon an individual’s GP in such cases in regard to issuing the prescription, and for monitoring and testing.’

What does NHS England advise regarding the interface between NHS and private services?

In their advice, NHS England quotes three main principles from DOH Guidance:

  1. The NHS should not withdraw NHS care because a patient chooses to buy private care, nor should patients who access private care be placed at an advantage or disadvantage in relation to the NHS care they receive.
  2. The NHS should continue to provide free of charge all care that the patient would have been entitled to had they not chosen to have additional private care.
  3. Where the same diagnostic, monitoring or other procedure is needed for both the NHS and private elements of care, the NHS should provide this free of charge and share the results with the private provider.
What about GMC Advice?

Their advice also summed up GMC advice which states, ‘GPs must cooperate with Gender Identity Clinics and other gender specialists by prescribing medications, providing follow up and making referrals as recommended by those specialists.’

The GMC Advice for doctors treating trans patients aims to help doctors see how the principles of Good medical practice apply in relation to trans patients and also to explain doctors’ duties under the Equality Act 2010 and other legislation.

The GMC’s advice was initially met with a variety of concerns from NHS GPs, and Dr Chaand Nagpaul CBE Chair, BMA General Practitioners Committee penned his concerns to the GMC raising the emotive points that this would, ‘make GPs undertake specialist prescribing, placing them in a difficult position and forcing them to prescribe outside the limits of their competence.’

Susan Goldsmith, acting chief executive of the GMC, replied with reassurances including that they expect GPs to, ‘acquire the knowledge and skills to be able to deliver a good service to their patient population’, which may mean undertaking training and that they don’t believe care for patients with gender dysphoria is a highly specialised treatment area requiring specific expertise.’

The medication for transgender care includes well-known oestrogen therapy used for treating female menopause (estradiol), injections that are given for women with endometriosis or men with prostate cancer (GNRH analogues), a diuretic used for heart failure (spironolactone), anti-androgens used in contraceptives (cyproterone acetate), medication for benign prostate hyperplasia (finasteride) and testosterone replacement therapy used for the management of the male menopause.

These are medications that are well known to GPs who are well-used to their side effects and monitoring needs. Although it is recognised that some of these medications are not currently licensed for use in these conditions, there is sufficient evidence of their efficacy and safety in the management of gender dysphoria.

Are there any specific questions I should ask you?

NHSE advise that GPs ensure that they are comfortable in prescribing under guidance, and recommend some screening questions. In order to make it easy for doctors to assure themselves of our services we have answered those questions here so that you can have the information you need without having to ask.

Do the GenderGP health professionals have sufficient expertise?

All of the doctors, nurses, healthcare assistants, counsellors, therapists, psychologists working with GenderGP are carefully selected for their knowledge, skills and attitude in the field of gender-related healthcare. GenderGP has 3000 transgender patients under our care and probably have more experience than any other centre in the UK.

All of our doctors, clinicians and therapists have many years experience of working with gender dysphoria, and follow strict International guidance for treatment protocols.

Which GenderGP clinician will be responsible for prescribing to my patient?

There is not one clinician with individual responsibility as each clinical decision on follow up is made by a multidisciplinary team that includes doctors, therapists and psychologists. The doctor that signs the prescription may vary as with any large specialist clinic, but the specialist team jointly makes the clinical decisions.

What qualifications do they have?

Each practitioner has the registration, indemnity and qualifications to suit their role. There is no specific training requirement to practice in this area, and no GMC register or GPSI qualification. Gender specialists may come from any field, endocrinology, psychiatry, General Practice, General Medicine. All GenderGP practitioners follow Internationally recognised best practice and guidance.

Gender specialists can come from any medical specialty. In the NHS Document “clinical models operated by England’s gender identity clinics” it states that, “Gender specialists may be from many different clinical backgrounds, some specialising in mental health: psychologists, psychiatrists, counselors or therapists, but they may also be GPs, endocrinologists, nurses etc.

In the WPATH Standards of Care Version 7: “With appropriate training, feminizing/masculinizing hormone therapy can be managed by a variety of providers, including nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and primary care physicians (Dahl et al., 2006).”

Which Professional Associations do you have links with?

Our Practitioners are members of the World Professional Association of Transgender Health. We do not have links with NHS-commissioned specialised Gender Identity Clinics because our specialists are located from various countries Internationally as there is a shortage of clinicians working in this field in the UK.

What continuous professional development do your practitioners have?

Our specialists all undergo annual CPD relevant to their role. GenderGP are frequent contributors at International conferences, and all of the relevant learning and teaching can be seen in our newsletters, podcasts and blog posts.

What are the criteria for treatment for adults?

The NHS England’s current commissioning protocol relates to the treatment of adults over the age of 17.

  • All of the health professionals that our patients are referred to for support and evaluation specialise in gender dysphoria and have vast and extensive experience in the assessment of management of patients who may have associated mental or emotional distress.
  • All patients are evaluated by at least two gender specialists, one of which is a medically qualified doctor and only the doctor will make decisions regarding endocrine treatments.
  • Our MDT meets regularly to discuss cases and management and to review and develop the service.
Do you provide counselling and advice re fertility?

Fertility preservation is a key priority and is discussed with all patients along with HFEA advice. More information can be found on our dedicated fertility page in the Help Centre.

Do you provide assessment for transgender youth under the age of 17?

Young people are assessed in line with the criteria published by The Endocrine Society Guidelines 2017. Puberty blockers are prescribed to transgender youth who fulfil the crtieria, once they have started puberty. Gender affirming hormones are prescribed to youth under the age of 17 if there are ‘compelling reasons to do so’ as agreed by the Endocrine Society 2017.

NHS England will, as part of the Gender Identity Development Service for Children and Adolescents, commission cross sex hormones for young people with continuing gender dysphoria from around their 16th birthday subject to individuals meeting the eligibility and readiness criteria.

The Endocrine Society 2017 Guidelines, and the WPATH Standards of Care Version 7 are internationally recognised as providing excellent guidance in the management of transgender patients.

All of our prescribing physicians have extensive knowledge and experience in endocrinology and are fully qualified to treat children and adults. Both NHS and private gender specialists come from many backgrounds, counselling, psychology, general practice, general medicine, psychiatry, endocrinology, paediatrics.

The WPATH criteria for mental health professionals working with children include:

  • Meet the competency requirements for mental health professionals working with adults;
  • Trained in childhood and adolescent developmental psychopathology;
  • Competent in diagnosing and treating the ordinary problems of children and adolescents.

The Endocrine Society Guidelines 2017 advise the following ‘We advise that only MHPs who meet the following criteria should diagnose GD/gender incongruence in children and adolescents:

  • training in child and adolescent developmental psychology and psychopathology,
  • competence in using the DSM and/or the ICD for diagnostic purposes,
  • the ability to make a distinction between GD/gender incongruence and conditions that have similar features (e.g., body dysmorphic disorder),
  • training in diagnosing psychiatric conditions,
  • the ability to undertake or refer for appropriate treatment,
  • the ability to psychosocially assess the person’s understanding and social conditions that can impact gender-affirming hormone therapy,
  • a practice of regularly attending relevant professional meetings, and
  • knowledge of the criteria for puberty blocking and gender-affirming hormone treatment in adolescents.

and

  • ‘We suggest that adolescents who meet diagnostic criteria for GD/gender incongruence, fulfill criteria for treatment, and are requesting treatment should initially undergo treatment to suppress pubertal development.
  • ‘We suggest that clinicians begin pubertal hormone suppression after girls and boys first exhibit physical changes of puberty.
  • ‘We recommend that, where indicated, GnRH analogues are used to suppress pubertal hormones.
  • ‘In adolescents who request sex hormone treatment (given this is a partly irreversible treatment), we recommend initiating treatment using a gradually increasing dose schedule after a multidisciplinary team of medical and MHPs has confirmed the persistence of GD/gender incongruence and sufficient mental capacity to give informed consent, which most adolescents have by age 16 years.
  • ‘We recognize that there may be compelling reasons to initiate sex hormone treatment prior to the age of 16 years in some adolescents with GD/gender incongruence, even though there are minimal published studies of gender-affirming hormone treatments administered before age 13.5 to 14 years. As with the care of adolescents ≥16 years of age, we recommend that an expert multidisciplinary team of medical and MHPs manage this treatment.’
What are the risks of withholding treatment for trans adolescents?

Women and Equalities Report 2016:

‘We recognise that there are legitimate concerns among service-users and their families about the clinical protocols which the clinic operates regarding access to puberty-blockers and cross-sex hormones. Failing to intervene in this way, or unnecessarily delaying such intervention, clearly has the potential to lead to seriously damaging consequences for very vulnerable young people, including the risk of selfharm and attempted suicide.

‘There is a clear and strong case that delaying treatment risks more harm than providing it. The treatment involved is primarily reversible, and the seriously dangerous consequences of not giving this treatment, including self-harming and suicide, are clearly well attested.

‘Accordingly, we recommend that, in the current review of the service specification and protocol for the Gender Identity Development Service, consideration be given to reducing the amount of time required for the assessment that service-users must undergo before puberty-blockers and cross-sex hormones can be prescribed.’

WPATH: ‘Refusing timely medical interventions for adolescents might prolong gender dysphoria and contribute to an appearance that could provoke abuse and stigmatization. As the level of gender-related abuse is strongly associated with the degree of psychiatric distress during adolescence (Nuttbrock et al., 2010), withholding puberty suppression and subsequent feminizing or masculinizing hormone therapy is not a neutral option for adolescents.

What if I don't want to accept responsibility for prescribing, monitoring and testing?

A GP may reasonably decline to accept responsibility for prescribing, monitoring and testing if the GP is not assured that the recommendation for prescribing has been made by an expert gender specialist, as long as the GP is also satisfied that declining responsibility would not pose a significant clinical risk to the individual.

Finance – FAQs

Do you accept BACS payments?

To send a one off payment or to set up a standing order with our bank account, please see the below instructions and bank account details:

When setting up a new payee with in your bank account, you will need to add GenderGP as a new international payee. Your bank will ask for the recipients details and the banks details which are:

 

Bank Details:

Recipients Full Name: GENDERGP PTE. LTD
Recipients Address: 160 Robinson Road, Business Federation Centre, Singapore

SWIFT/BIC: MODRGB21
IBAN: GB 38MO DR04 0085 0040 0572
Bank Name: Modulr FS Limited​​​​​​​
Bank Address: 58 Wood Ln, London, W12 7RZ, United Kingdom

Reference: Please put your last name and year of birth eg. SMITH1994

 

This account has been tested and no fees should be applied when transferring money to this account. However, before confirming this payment, please ensure you have read through the transaction terms and check that no fee will be applied by your bank due to it being an international payment.

If the payment is subject to a fee, please do not confirm the payment and message through to our Help Centre for assistance.

Once we have received the payment, we will be in contact to confirm this with you.

Once you have added GenderGP as a payee, you should not have to add them to your bank again.

If you have any questions, please feel free to get in touch here.

I need to change the details on the bank card I am currently using to pay my subscription. Please advise on how I do this?

Our team is standing by to help. Please contact a member of the team via the Help Centre and they will be able to assist you.

I would like to request a refund for a payment, how can I do this?

Firstly, please read our Finance Policy to see if you meet the criteria for a refund. If you would still like to discuss a refund, please contact a member of the team via our Help Centre.

How can I cancel my subscription?

You may cancel at any time by submitting a cancellation notice either through your Chargedesk account or via our Help Centre, one month prior to the next billing cycle.

Are any discounts available?

While we are a private service, we understand that some people may struggle to pay for their care. As such we do all we can to work with patients on a case-by-case basis to see if they meet the criteria for discounted services.

This does not apply to any medications and session costs.

For more information, please get in touch via our Help Centre.

Can I receive an invoice for my payments?

All invoices are automatically generated once you have made payment and can be found on your Chargedesk account or email receipt.

GenderGP Global FAQs

What services does GenderGP offer?

GenderGP is a health and wellbeing service for trans and non-binary people. We offer access to medical and therapy services to help people who wish to transition. We help people who want to take hormones to prevent pubertal development, or to masculinise or feminise their bodies so that their bodies more closely match their gender identity.

How do prescriptions work?

The details you provide during your application process are reviewed to help you make the best choices on what medication is the safest and most effective option. We can then either make some recommendations to your doctor, or raise a prescription for you to have dispensed by your preferred pharmacy. You would then arrange to pay for the medication, the costs of which are set by the pharmacy.

How do I get started with GenderGP Services?

The first step is to complete an online application (Appraisal Pathway) form on our website. We will ask you some questions about your gender identity, your general health and your goals for gender-affirming care. Our team will review your information and reach out to discuss the next steps.

What Services Does GenderGP Offer?

GenderGP offers a range of services including access to hormonal replacement therapy, counselling, voice therapy, advice for social transition, surgery referrals and documentation services. Our main goal is to provide access to safe, compassionate and individualised health and wellbeing service for everyone.

What Age Group Does GenderGP Serve?

GenderGP provides care for all age groups. We offer support to children, young people and adults. We also offer support and advice for family members and loved ones, schools and employers.

How do I pay for GenderGP’s Services?

We accept payment via credit card and debit card. We are committed to providing accessible care. If you are experiencing financial hardship, please contact our friendly team here to discuss potential options.

Is GenderGP a confidential Service?

Yes, confidentiality is at the core of our practice. We adhere to strict data protection laws and healthcare regulations to ensure your information is kept secure and confidential.

How can I contact GenderGP?

You can contact us via our Help Centre. If you have a medical emergency, it’s important to contact your local emergency services. While we strive to respond as quickly as possible, our service is not intended for immediate medical emergencies.

Can I use GenderGP services from any country?

Yes, we provide services worldwide. However, depending on where you are, the processes for getting your medication may vary due to local regulations.

UK Service Provision FAQs

Is GenderGP recognised by the NHS?

While GenderGP is an independent provider of health and wellbeing services, our specialist team works in accordance with international standards for transgender healthcare. We are happy to work collaboratively with your NHS GP, with yours and your GP’s consent, to help you receive comprehensive care.

How can I get my medication in the UK?

GenderGP can issue an electronic prescription token which can be dispensed at your local UK pharmacy. Alternatively, we can also send prescriptions directly to one of our trusted partner pharmacies who can deliver the medication directly to your door. We may also be able to provide a treatment summary to your GP for them to prescribe your medication for you.

Can I use my NHS prescription at GenderGP’s partner pharmacies?

Yes, simply give your prescription to the pharmacy for them to dispense.

Are GenderGP’s services covered by the NHS or UK health insurance providers?

GenderGP services are not funded by the NHS. Some private insurance providers may cover our services, but it’s important to check with your provider for specifics about your policy.

My pharmacist said electronic prescriptions aren't accepted in Wales.

In Wales, the NHS Electronic Prescription Service (EPS) is the most commonly accepted method for electronic prescriptions. However, private electronic prescriptions from systems like Clynxx can be accepted at the majority of pharmacies depending on the specific requirements of each pharmacy. Should you encounter any difficulties with your pharmacy accepting our electronic prescriptions, you can reach out to Clynxx directly for further guidance, via their live chat here.

My pharmacist said they can’t dispense an electronic prescription for a controlled drug.

In the UK, prescriptions for Schedule 2, 3 and 4 Controlled Drugs can be dispensed using an electronic prescription. Testosterone is considered a Schedule 4 Controlled Drug. GenderGP and Clynxx follow all the regulations set out in The Human Medicines Regulation 2012 and our prescriptions also follow the guidance set out in The Misuse of Drugs Regulation 2001.

EU/EEA Service Provision FAQs

How can I get my prescribed medication?

There are several ways that we can help you get your medication:

 

  • Partner Pharmacy Dispensing: We can send your prescription to one of our trusted pharmacy partners and they will send you the medication in the post. Please note, one of our key partners, Life Pharmacy, has temporarily halted dispensing direct-to-pharmacy prescriptions via their delivery services. We’re working with them to review this service, so we hope this measure is temporary. Meanwhile, members in Ireland who can visit Life Pharmacy in person can continue to receive their medication directly from them.
  • Electronic Prescriptions: We can provide you with an electronic prescription, which can be delivered to you electronically when your prescription is signed. This can then be taken to your local pharmacy, or an online pharmacy, for dispensing just like a traditional paper prescription.
  • Paper Prescriptions: We can send you a paper prescription in the post to an address you specify, for you to take to the pharmacy of your choice and they will dispense the medication. Please be aware that delivery of paper prescriptions may take up to 10 working days.
  • Shared Care: We can send a treatment summary to your doctor, advising what medication they should prescribe for them to prescribe for you.
What is cross-border dispensing?

Cross-border dispensing refers to the process of obtaining medication from a pharmacy located in a different country to that where the member resides. It allows members to access medications that may not be readily available or accessible in their home country.

What if my medication gets denied at the border?

We recommend you contact the appropriate border control authorities for current and pertinent information relating to the importation of the medication you’re importing and follow their advice at all times.

Could I face legal consequences if I attempt to bring medication across the border?

As long as you have the necessary documentation and follow the regulations, you should not face legal consequences.

I am prescribed feminising treatment. Do any restrictions apply to me?

Restrictions primarily concern masculinising treatments like testosterone. Feminising treatments are generally not subject to restrictions.

Why is masculinising treatment subject to restrictions?

Testosterone is subject to stricter regulations due to its potential for abuse or misuse.

I am a transmasculine person who is prescribed puberty blockers only. Do the restrictions on masculinising medications still affect me?

Puberty blockers are not subject to the same restrictions as testosterone. Therefore, you should not face the same limitations.

Can you send medication to a PO box address?

We can arrange for our EU partner pharmacy to send puberty blockers and feminising hormones to a PO box address. However, please be aware that there can be occasional delays and holds on deliveries as they pass through customs. Unfortunately, we are unable to deliver testosterone medication to a PO box due to strict regulations on importing testosterone medication.

How long does it take to receive my medication from your EU Partner Pharmacy?

We recently had to implement some changes to our services with Life Pharmacy, one of our key pharmacy partners for EU members. They’ve temporarily halted the dispensing of direct-to-pharmacy prescriptions through their delivery services. While this is under review and we hope it’s a temporary measure, we’ve made sure you still retain access to necessary care. All our EU members can continue to receive FreeRx and paper prescriptions.

For our members in Ireland specifically, electronic FreeRx prescriptions might have limited acceptance, as they are generally accepted more widely via the Healthmail system. However, you still have the option to receive paper prescriptions. If you do choose to use our electronic prescriptions, it’s a good idea to consult with your local pharmacy about their specific requirements. And good news for those who can visit Life Pharmacy in person – you can continue to receive your medication directly by visiting the pharmacy at 35-41 Parnell Street, Dublin, D01 HW5.

Remember, we’re here to provide support and guidance in light of these changes. Don’t hesitate to reach out if you have any further questions or concerns. As always, we’re working hard to ensure a safe and effective service for our members. Thank you for your understanding!

How long will I have to wait to receive my paper prescription?

It usually takes between 1-3 working days for us to process your request and up to 10 working days for delivery. We strongly recommend that you submit your repeat prescription requests whenever you have four weeks’ supply remaining so that you don’t run out in between requests.

Irish Service Provision FAQs

irish faq table
Recent Changes to Life Pharmacy Services

We recently had to implement some changes to our services with Life Pharmacy, one of our key pharmacy partners for EU members. They’ve temporarily halted the dispensing of direct-to-pharmacy prescriptions through their delivery services. While this is under review and we hope it’s a temporary measure, we’ve made sure you still retain access to necessary care. All our EU members can continue to receive FreeRx and paper prescriptions.

For our members in Ireland specifically, electronic FreeRx prescriptions might have limited acceptance, as they are generally accepted more widely via the Healthmail system. However, you still have the option to receive paper prescriptions. If you do choose to use our electronic prescriptions, it’s a good idea to consult with your local pharmacy about their specific requirements. And good news for those who can visit Life Pharmacy in person – you can continue to receive your medication directly by visiting the pharmacy at 35-41 Parnell Street, Dublin, D01 HW5.

Remember, we’re here to provide support and guidance in light of these changes. Don’t hesitate to reach out if you have any further questions or concerns. As always, we’re working hard to ensure a safe and effective service for our members. Thank you for your understanding!

My pharmacist said electronic prescriptions aren't accepted in Ireland.

Electronic prescriptions may have limited acceptance in Ireland as electronic prescriptions are generally accepted through the Healthmail system. Private electronic prescriptions, like those from Clynxx or EEARX, may not be considered legally valid in some pharmacies in Ireland in accordance with the emergency supply provisions of Regulation 8 of the Medicinal Products (Prescription and Control of Supply) Regulations 2003 (as amended), however some will accept them. To ensure access to your medication, you can choose to receive a paper prescription or our FreeRx electronic prescriptions, providing your pharmacy has confirmed they can accept private electronic prescriptions. It is essential to consult your local pharmacy about their specific requirements for electronic prescriptions.

Does GenderGP offer prescriptions to Irish members under the age of 18?

Yes, GenderGP does offer prescriptions to Irish members under the age of 18. However, it is important to know that electronic prescriptions have limited acceptance in Ireland. To access your medication, you can choose a paper prescription or use GenderGP’s EU partner pharmacy. Always consult your local pharmacy for their specific requirements regarding electronic prescriptions.

Norwegian Service Provision FAQs

I thought that Norwegian members couldn’t access care from GenderGP. What has changed?

GenderGP has been diligently reviewing Norwegian regulations and working to overcome barriers to providing care for our Norwegian members. Our efforts have led to a better understanding of the local regulations and an improved ability to offer our services to individuals in Norway.

What is the problem with obtaining Testosterone in Norway?

Each country has their own rules about handling prescription medication, and unfortunately the rules have changed making it difficult for people receiving masculinising treatment who live in Norway to receive medication through the post.

Who is affected?

While there are restrictions in place with how testosterone prescriptions are provided to Norwegian members, we have been able to resolve the issues affecting members receiving Masculinising treatment. GenderGP members in Norway who are receiving Masculinising treatment such as testosterone, can now once again access our full service provision.

Please see this summary table regarding affected services:

Italian Trulli

Can I still access shared care through my local doctor?

If your doctor is prescribing under our guidance, that can continue. We are very happy to make every recommendation to your doctor, but the decision to prescribe ultimately lies with each local healthcare provider.

Does this mean I can use your EU partner pharmacy?

Please note, one of our key partners, Life Pharmacy, has temporarily halted dispensing direct-to-pharmacy prescriptions via their delivery services. We’re working with them to review this service, so we hope this measure is temporary.

Are paper prescriptions accepted in Norwegian pharmacies?

Yes, paper prescriptions signed by one of our partnered EU prescribers are accepted in Norway. There is still confusion around testosterone, and we cannot guarantee all pharmacies will accept paper prescriptions for testosterone. If you choose to have a paper prescription for testosterone, we’d love to hear from you about your experience getting it dispensed. Please be aware that delivery of paper prescriptions may take up to 10 working days.

Are electronic prescriptions accepted in Norwegian pharmacies?

Unfortunately, electronic prescriptions signed by doctors outside of Norway are not currently accepted. However, our paper prescriptions are widely accepted by Norwegian pharmacies, allowing you to obtain medication.

I am prescribed testosterone. How is it best for me to have my medication dispensed?

Obtaining testosterone in Norway can be complex due to regulations. While there are some exceptions for testosterone prescriptions from EU countries, the process requires a case-by-case analysis. We are seeking further clarification on this matter. In the meantime, we recommend speaking with your chosen pharmacy and asking if they accept prescriptions from a prescriber in the EU.

Is it legal for me to bring medication across the border from another country into Norway?

Yes it is legal to bring medication across the border into Norway, provided you follow the necessary regulations and have the required documentation. We recommend checking your country’s regulations before travelling.

What documentation will I need in order for me to bring my medication across the border?

If you are wishing to collect your medication from outside of Norway, the following restrictions apply:

  • You may bring a maximum of a 30-day supply of Testosterone to Norway, provided you can demonstrate the medication is for personal use.

  • We advise you to retain the original packaging and informational leaflet of the medication, and request a copy of your prescription (free) for use during travel.

  • We can supply a free copy of your prescription and a travelling with medication letter (£25) for these purposes.

  • We recommend checking with the appropriate border control authorities for current and pertinent information relating to the importation of a schedule 3 controlled drug before travel.

Source: LOVDATA, April 2023 – Section 19. Bringing in medicinal products containing drugs for personal medical use by travellers.

I’m prescribed testosterone and Sweden is my closest neighbouring country. Can I pick it up from there?

Currently, paper prescriptions containing testosterone cannot be dispensed in Sweden.

Swedish Service Provision FAQs

What is the problem with obtaining Testosterone in Sweden?

Each country has their own rules about handling prescription medication, and unfortunately the rules have changed making it difficult for people receiving masculinising treatment who live in Sweden to receive medication through the post. You can travel to a neighbouring country to get your prescription filled if you need to.

Sweden has confirmed that the dispensing and delivery of masculinising medication (those containing testosterone) from foreign pharmacies is still prohibited. Information as to why is available here.

Can I get feminising treatment?

GenderGP members in Sweden who are receiving feminising treatment can get this dispensed from their local pharmacy.

Please see this summary table regarding affected services:

Sweden FAQ Table

How can I get my prescription?

We are able to send your paper prescription to anywhere that you want us to. Some examples that people have asked for, are:

  • Send the paper prescription to them at home and they have taken it to a pharmacy in their own country who is happy to dispense the medication.

  • Send the paper prescription to them at home and they have taken it to a pharmacy in a neighbouring country where the regulations allow for the dispensing of private prescriptions containing masculinising medication.

  • Please note, one of our key partners, Life Pharmacy, has temporarily halted dispensing direct-to-pharmacy prescriptions via their delivery services. We’re working with them to review this service, so we hope this measure is temporary.

*Please note that delivery of paper prescriptions may take up to 10 working days.

Are there any restrictions on travelling with medication?

If you are wishing to collect your medication from outside of Sweden, the following restrictions apply:

  • You can travel to Sweden with a 14 days supply of testosterone as long as you can show the medication is for your personal use.

  • You can travel to Sweden with a 3 month supply of other medications as long as you can show the medication is for your personal use.

  • We are able to provide you with a copy of your prescription (free) and a travelling with medication letter (£25) for these purposes.

What if I am on injections?

If you are finding it difficult to access your injection medication, then please ask the team to advise on the other options available. All of the medicines that we use can be given to you in different ways. For example testosterone injections can be swapped to testosterone gel, blocker injections can be given as a nasal spray.

What are GenderGP doing to help?

We understand how important it is for you to be able to access gender-affirming care, and we also understand that there are sometimes people who want to make this difficult for you. At GenderGP, we are always working with authorities and leaders to give them the best and most unbiased information.

We have already had success in engaging with the Swedish Medical Products Agency to help our members who require feminising medication to continue accessing their treatment. We further continue to work on behalf of our members receiving masculinising treatment to help them to also have better access to their care.

We are also expanding our network of pharmacies and other partners who will help us achieve our mission – for you to be able to live your life more easily.

I am having issues receiving my feminising medication, or getting my paper prescription filled. What can I do?
  • Paper Prescriptions: For Swedish members requiring a paper prescription for feminising medication the latest information from the Swedish Medical Products agency is that paper prescriptions issued inside the EU and EEA can be dispensed by Swedish pharmacies.

    If you are challenged on this by your pharmacy, you can refer to the SMPA information and advice here.


  • Medication Delivery: For Swedish members wanting to order feminising medication via GenderGP’s preferred EU pharmacy partner the latest information we have from the Swedish Medical Products agency is that we can send feminising medication via our normal delivery service.

    If your package is delayed or there is an issue at customs, you can refer to the information issued by the SMPA here.

Finnish Service Provision FAQs

What is the problem with obtaining Testosterone in Finland?

Each country has their own rules about handling prescription medication, and unfortunately the rules have changed making it difficult for people receiving masculinising treatment who live in Finland to receive medication through the post.

Who is affected?

At present, only members receiving masculinising treatment are affected. We have been able to resolve the issues affecting members receiving feminising treatment. GenderGP members in Finland who are receiving feminising treatment can now once again access our full service provision.

Please see this summary table regarding affected services:

Finland FAQ Table

What has Changed?

Finland adopted the same regulation as Sweden regarding the electronic prescribing and importing of testosterone medication; however, Finnish pharmacies will still accept paper prescriptions.

We have also sought clarification from the Finnish government regarding the posting of medication, and are awaiting a formal response.

For Finnish members requiring a paper prescription for masculinising medications (those containing testosterone) we can provide this as per our normal service and currently there appears to be no restrictions on where this can be dispensed. *Please note that delivery of paper prescriptions may take up to 10 working days.

I am having issues receiving my feminising medication, or getting my paper prescription filled. What can I do?
  • Paper Prescriptions: For Finnish members requiring a paper prescription for feminising and masculinising medication, the latest information is that paper prescriptions issued inside the EU and EEA can be dispensed. For further information please see here.

  • Medication Delivery: Please note, one of our key partners, Life Pharmacy, has temporarily halted dispensing direct-to-pharmacy prescriptions via their delivery services. We’re working with them to review this service, so we hope this measure is temporary.

American Service Provision FAQs

Can I use your electronic prescriptions in the United States?

We are conscientious of the rapidly changing public health policies for trans and gender diverse community members in the USA.

The prescriptions we provide are signed by doctors based in the EU. We would recommend getting in touch with your local pharmacy for guidance on whether they can accept EU prescriptions for dispensing.

You may find our list of Global Resources useful.

What alternatives do I have for getting a prescription in the United States?

We can offer a detailed treatment summary which you can share with your primary care provider. It will instruct them on which medications they should prescribe for you and any blood tests that you require for ongoing monitoring purposes. The treatment summary can foster shared care between your local U.S-based healthcare provider and GenderGP, allowing for continued coordination of your treatment.

Australian Service Provision FAQs

Is it possible to use GenderGP’s electronic prescriptions in Australia?

The prescriptions we provide are signed by doctors based in the EU. We would recommend getting in touch with your local pharmacy for guidance on whether they can accept EU prescriptions for dispensing.

You may find our list of Global Resources useful.

What alternatives do I have for getting a prescription in Australia?

We can provide you with a comprehensive treatment summary. It will instruct them on which medications they should prescribe for you and any blood tests that you require for ongoing monitoring purposes. This document can act as a bridge, encouraging a shared care arrangement between your local Australian healthcare provider and GenderGP, thus ensuring your treatment continues to be managed effectively.

Electronic Prescription FAQs

Who are Clynxx and what is FreeRX?

Clynxx is a private, advanced electronic prescribing system, and FreeRX is the advanced electronic prescription which replaces the paper prescriptions you’ll be used to.

What is an electronic FreeRx prescription?

An electronic prescription is a digital version of a paper prescription. Instead of a physical copy, the prescription is sent to you electronically for dispensing at your chosen pharmacy. This eliminates the need for paper prescriptions, reduces the reliance on delivery services, and streamlines the prescription process.

Why is GenderGP transitioning from paper prescriptions to electronic FreeRx prescriptions?

GenderGP is transitioning to electronic FreeRx prescriptions to improve efficiency, enhance security and reduce the environmental impact of our prescription process. Electronic prescriptions are faster, less prone to errors, and more convenient for both members and healthcare providers.

When is GenderGP transitioning away from paper prescriptions in the UK?

We began transitioning away from paper prescriptions as a first dispensing option for England and Scotland on the 1st of August 2023. Electronic prescriptions will be taking over as our main method for providing prescriptions.

How do I use an electronic FreeRX prescription?

After our partnered prescribers approve and sign your prescription, you will receive your electronic prescription through both text and email. Upon receiving your prescription, please follow the below steps to use your electronic prescription:

 

  • Visit your chosen pharmacy, and provide the pharmacist with the website address eearx.com.

  • Give the pharmacist your date of birth and the Token ID associated with your prescription.

  • The pharmacist will access your prescription and determine if they can dispense your medication.

  • If they can, they will mark the prescription as dispensed, ensuring it cannot be dispensed by another pharmacy.

  • If they are unable to dispense the prescription due to stock unavailability or any other reason, they will advise you to take your prescription to a different pharmacy.

Can I print my FreeRX electronic prescription sent to me via Clynxx?

No.

Members should not print or download their electronic prescription received in the email/text, as this will invalidate their prescription, and will incur an extra charge when requesting a replacement. Electronic prescriptions can ONLY be opened and printed by the pharmacy of your choice. A pharmacy can print or download the prescription following the steps in the email that was sent to you.

Will my personal information be safe with electronic prescriptions?

Yes, electronic prescriptions are designed with security in mind. All prescription information is encrypted and securely transmitted within our prescribing software. Additionally, electronic prescriptions are subject to strict data privacy regulations, ensuring that your personal information is protected.

What if I prefer paper prescriptions?

While we understand that some individuals may prefer paper prescriptions, we believe that the benefits of electronic prescriptions far outweigh any potential drawbacks. Electronic prescriptions are more efficient, secure, and environmentally friendly. If you have concerns about the transition, we recommend that you reach out to your chosen pharmacy for information relating to their required criteria.

Can I still use my existing paper prescription?

Yes, If you have any existing paper prescriptions, you will be able to use them until their expiry date. Paper prescriptions are valid for 6 months from the date of issue, with the exception of testosterone prescriptions, which are valid for 28 days from the date of issue.

Will all pharmacies accept electronic FreeRx prescriptions?

UK – The majority of pharmacies in the UK now accept private electronic prescriptions. You should find most large pharmacy chains accept private electronic prescriptions. We do, however, recommend that you reach out to your chosen pharmacy for information relating to their required criteria.

 

EU & EEA – In the EU/EEA, pharmacies are generally required to accept electronic prescriptions issued by healthcare professionals who are authorised to do so within the relevant country. However, there may be some variation in the acceptance of electronic prescriptions across different countries and pharmacies, and it’s recommended that you contact your chosen pharmacy to confirm their specific requirements and processes for accepting electronic prescriptions.

Are there any additional costs associated with electronic prescriptions?

Electronic prescriptions are a more affordable alternative to paper prescriptions, priced at £9.99. By transitioning to electronic prescriptions, we aim to improve the overall process and reduce the costs related to accessing gender affirming medication.

What should I do if I encounter issues with the dispensing of my electronic prescription?

On occasion, a pharmacist may refuse to dispense medication if they are unfamiliar with it. If you encounter this situation, we suggest contacting other local pharmacies. Check their stock availability and confirm they can dispense the medication prescribed.

How can I learn more about electronic prescriptions used by GenderGP?

You can learn more about our prescribing platform Clynxx, by visiting their website here.

Why can’t I order more than what is written on the prescription?

Pharmacies can only dispense the amount of medication that is written on the prescription.

How can I contact your partner pharmacy dispensing my medication?

If you need to contact the pharmacy that is dispensing your medication, we will provide you with their contact information once your prescription has been signed and sent for dispensing.

Where can I get my FreeRX electronic prescription dispensed?

As we provide our services to members across many parts of the world, the availability of pharmacies to dispense your medication will vary depending on your location. However, your FreeRX electronic prescription can often be dispensed from a range of local pharmacies in the UK and much of the EU/EEA. If you encounter any challenges while trying to get your electronic prescription filled, we suggest contacting additional local pharmacies to check if they have the required stock and can dispense your medication.

Is the cost of my prescription included in the subscription fee?

If you choose to have your prescription dispensed via one of our partner pharmacies, the cost of your prescription is included in your subscription fee, and you will not need to pay any extra fees. However, if you choose to have your FreeRX electronic prescription sent to you to take to your preferred pharmacy, there will be an admin fee of £9.99 charged by GenderGP.

Will I need to pay for the medication?

Partner pharmacies – The cost of your medication will be payable to the partner pharmacy. They will contact you directly by email with a link to make the payment.

 

FreeRX – The cost of medication will be payable to the pharmacy you take your FreeRX electronic prescription to. The price for the medication may vary.

Problems having your electronic prescription dispensed?

On occasion, a pharmacist may refuse to dispense medication if they are unfamiliar with it. If you encounter this situation, we suggest contacting other local pharmacies. Check their stock availability and confirm they can dispense the medication prescribed.

The medication on my prescription is wrong or needs to be changed.

If you find that the medication on your prescription is incorrect or needs to be changed, please reach out to our friendly team via our Help Centre and provide us with the details of what needs to be corrected. Our team will be happy to assist you and arrange a treatment review or for a new prescription to be issued where necessary.