en English

Fundraising for trans healthcare has found a new home thanks to the likes of @Hbombrguy who raised a staggering $340,000 for Mermaids in 2019 and @theymerSophie whose livestream on Twitch late in 2020 raised a phenomenal £50,000 towards the GenderGP Fund – an amount that was matched by GenderGP in in-kind donations. Inspired by these incredible fundraising feats, Twitch streamer Ed Sweet, is holding his own live stream to raise funds for trans youth over the weekend of February 20th and 21st.

In this episode of the GenderGP Podcast, Ed joins Dr Helen and two other gamers, Dr Helen’s own son, Jack, and Rhy, one of GenderGP’s Pathway Advisors. Together they discuss the forthcoming stream “Mario Kart for Hope’’, how vital fundraising is for trans youth in the UK right now, and why Twitch is the perfect fundraising platform for this community.

If you have been affected by any of the topics discussed in our podcast, and would like to get in touch, please contact us via the Help Centre. You can also contact us on social media where you will find us at @GenderGP on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

We are always happy to accept ideas for future shows, so if there is something in particular you would like us to discuss, or a specific guest you would love to hear from, let us know. Your feedback is really important to us. If you could take a minute or two to leave us a rating and a review for the podcast on your favourite podcast app, it will help others to discover us.

 

Links:

Podcast: Pronouns in bio
Follow Ed on Twitter: @EdwardTSweet
Twitch: SuperSweetBoy https://www.twitch.tv/supersweetboy
Follow @theymerSophie on Twitter
Read about Hbomberguy here: The Guardian
Mermaids
Article: Livestream results in £100K pot to provide healthcare for trans kids

 

The GenderGP Podcast

How gaming became a lifeline for trans youth

 

Hello, this is Dr Helen Webberley. Welcome to our GenderGP Podcast, where we will be discussing some of the issues affecting the trans and non-binary community in the world today, together with my co-host Marianne Oakes, a trans woman herself, and our head of therapy.

 

Dr Helen Webberley:
Welcome to another edition of our podcast. Unusual one this week, we have a gaming podcast, a little bit outside of my comfort zone as a mom and a doctor. But just recently, I did happen to find myself massively immersed in the world of gaming, which I think we’ll talk about a little bit later. I’ve got some cool guests with me today. If I’m allowed to say that word cool without being too uncool. And I’m going to let them introduce themselves. So we have Ed, we have Jack, we have Rhy. Ed, over to you first, introduce yourself, tell us why you’re here and what’s happening.

Ed:
Okay. So obviously, I’m Ed, a streamer on Twitch under the name SuperSweetBoy. I do a mix of games and dramatic read-throughs of stories. And on the 20th of February, I am doing a fundraiser for GenderGP called Mario Kart for Hope.

Jack Webberley:
My name is Jack. I am also a gamer. I am also a student in Cardiff University, studying civil engineering. I am on today because last night mum asked me, could you please come on as a gamer and basically make sure she doesn’t embarrass herself.

Ed:
You were her back up.

Jack Webberley:
Yeah, back up.

Rhy Brignell:
Hi, my name is Rhy. My pronouns are they/them. I would describe myself as a casual gamer for the shame. I work as a pathway advisor for GenderGP, and I also have my own comedy pop culture podcast for trans and queer people called Pronouns in Bio. So check us out if you like podcasts.

Dr Helen Webberley:
Tell us what it’s all about, the Mario Kart for Hope.

Ed:
Okay. So recently, well, I was inspired to do this because of earlier in the year or late last year, I was inspired by Theymer Sophie doing a stream to raise money for GenderGP by playing Hades. And that ended up raising over 50,000 for the organization. And I think that was incredible. And especially with the toxicity at the moment surrounding trans people in the UK, trans and non binary people in the UK, I wanted to kind of throw my weight behind helping those in need, get the help, even by just doing something like fundraising, just doing some good.

Dr Helen Webberley:
Brilliant. So, thank you. You were there when Theymer Sophie’s stream came to our attention that evening. Tell us, tell us what happened and tell us the excitement that it caused.

Jack Webberley:
Well, it was really good, actually. So I was just sat in my flat with my girlfriend and mum messages me, she’s likes like, Jack, what is Twitch? I have no idea what’s going on here. Someone’s tweeted at me saying that they’re doing this big livestream on Twitch, so I had look at it and I was like, mum, this is actually, this is a big deal. This person has a lot of, a lot of viewers. Lot of people that are donating. This is a big deal. And then, so she said to me, how do I make, how do I make a sort of a big statement saying that I really support this? This is amazing. And I said, you see that at the bottom, they had a donation goal for the whole duration of the, I think it was three days. And I said, if you meet that donation right now on the first day, that would be a massive thing. And it would, it would look really, really good. And it was amazing. And then even after that, I think the donation goal was raised by like three or four times the original goal. And it was just crazy and it was such a good atmosphere. The gaming was really good and it was really emotional and it was amazing. I really, I thought it was amazing watching that. Me and my girlfriend sat in theflat, like both really excited watching. It was really, really nice.

Dr Helen Webberley:
It was really exciting and a little bit nerve wracking. And as I have been very brave and saying, I had had a few glasses of wine when we were doing it, and it was, you know, the atmosphere was really, really, really good. Rhy, Ed told us that Theymer Sophie raised a lot of money for GenderGP as an organization. What happens to that money?

Rhy Brignell:
Yeah, so we, GenderGP recently, recently-ish started a fund for under sixteens to access subsidized care through us. So that money directly goes towards covering all the setup costs and the session costs that are part of our process and then going towards medication costs as well, so that we can completely cover the cost of healthcare for young people.

Dr Helen Webberley:
Why is it important? What is it? Why are young people such a target? Why are they so important? Why do they need the help? Why can’t they get the help on the NHS? Because that should be where the help is coming from. What’s the problem at the moment, do you think?

Rhy Brignell:
So care for under sixteens under the NHS has been very difficult for a long time. The waiting lists just to be seen for your first appointment can range anywhere up to four years, just to be seen. And obviously going through puberty, you know, the clock is kind of against you and the clock is ticking. So a four year waitlist is completely unacceptable. And in recent UK news, the Bell v. Tavistock judgment has made it increasingly more difficult to access the medication that trans youth may need. And so increasingly more and more trans youth are needing to turn to private health care to access the medication they should just be able to get onto the NHS. So raising money for, for this incredibly vulnerable group of people is a very good thing to do so, yeah, thank you to the streamers for putting the work in for us. We very much appreciate it.

Dr Helen Webberley:
Ed, you’ve chosen Mario Kart, but you also mentioned that that dramatic read through of stories. Are those two connected or can you not have a dramatic read through of Mario Kart?

Ed:
One of the donation incentives is dramatic read through where it’s like, it’s a mix of things, not necessarily related to Mario Kart, but stuff like just reading some comedy sketches and radio scripts, that kind of thing, because I’ve had the pleasure of knowing a few, a few people through my time on Twitch who are fantastic at that sort of thing and inspired me to do that. And in particular, one called Ar_crat whose partner goes by TenTinyKittens online is themselves nonbinary.

Dr Helen Webberley:
So, Jack, tell me, Mario Kart, for those who don’t know, and I do because I’ve seen your play, but for those who don’t, tell us what it is, what is Mario Kart Eight, I think it is, what’s the deal? And what do you have to do? Is there any trans representation amongst the characters already, or do we need to create someone and engineer (unclear 7:19).

Ed:
So officially there are no trans characters in the Mario series. I say that there is a more obscure character called Birdo introduced in Super Mario Brothers 2, who isn’t necessarily canonically trans, but they aren’t in much, many of the games in the series. But in the Mario Kart games themselves, there isn’t really any, or much in the way of actual representation in a lot of Nintendo’s games and in these big blockbuster franchises–

Rhy Brignell:
I will, can I jump in?

Ed:
Yeah, by all means?

Rhy Brignell:
I will say that for me personally, and I think for a lot of online trans people, Donkey Kong has become sort of synonymous with trans rights.

Ed:
That is true. That is correct.

Rhy Brignell:
So in early 2019, a streamer called of Hbomberguy did a charity stream where he played Donkey Kong 64 for like three days straight or something like that. And he raised money for Mermaids. And this was in response to a certain Irish comedy writer complaining about the lottery funding that Mermaids were receiving and that kind of–

Jack Webberley:
(unclear 8:43).

Rhy Brignell:
I wasn’t sure, I wasn’t sure. I was erring on the side of caution. And so, yeah, Hbomberguy started a charity stream for Donkey Kong in response to raise money for Mermaids. And it was like wildly successful, he raised like 200,000 pounds for Mermaids. And since then Donkey Kong has kind of become like a reclaimed symbol of, I think, of trans rights within the gaming industry.

Ed:
Absolutely. What I liked the fact that streaming as well was that you had, you had voice actors from various games, come on and say trans rights are human rights as their characters. So you had Johnson John, the voice of Duke Nukem. I think you had Grant Kirkhope, a composer for Donkey Kong 64. And I think you had the voice of Donkey Kong say trans rights are human rights. I think that was Grant Kirkhope.

Rhy Brignell:
Yeah. That was like loads of celebrities that came onto the stream.

Ed:
AOC.

Rhy Brignell:
AOC, Chelsea Manning came on. Yeah, a couple of authors, writers, and like a few celebrities tweeted in support. Neil Gaiman tweeted. Matt Mercer. It was fairly successful. I would say that it might’ve sort of inspired maybe a trend towards doing charity live streams for trans rights after the success of Hbomberguy.

Ed:
Yeah. I definitely think that’s led to a lot of inspiration.

Jack Webberley:
It’s a great platform, isn’t it, really, Twitch? Because the community is so nice. So open to all this sort of stuff and knowing you’re not going to get judged over Twitch and stuff like that. So I think it’s a great platform for fundraisers, for trans rights, and stuff like that.

Ed:
It’s so diverse too.

Jack Webberley:
Yeah.

Rhy Brignell:
Yeah. It absolutely fosters a sense of community, which especially now during COVID-19, when we’re all kind of stuck inside, it allows you to feel connected to other people like you and particularly in support of a common cause if it’s for a charity, it’s a really valuable service.

Ed:
Yeah, and though there is still a way to go in terms of Twitch itself actually recognizing and platforming trans people. Because one thing that I have seen a lot of streamers talk about is the need for a trans tag on Twitch streams.

Jack Webberley:
Yep.

Dr Helen Webberley:
Okay. So there’s a couple of things that–

Jack Webberley:
No, no, no. That’s, that’s what I was just agreeing. I think that’s a great, yeah, it can’t be too long before that happens there. It seems like the sort of basic thing that they should be there –

Dr Helen Webberley:
So is that something we need to do then? Do we need to write to Twitch? I know that’s very old fashioned. Yeah, let’s do it. Let’s do it. Let’s get that. Let’s get that in action. So we need a trans Yoshi, what’s that guy with the turtle back that you’ve heard the word turtle. Do you still have those?

Ed:
Koopa Troopas.

Jack Webberley:
Koopa.

Dr Helen Webberley:
Then we definitely need trans representation in one of those as well. So let’s get on to Nintendo and Twitch during this event. Let’s (unclear 11:52) that presentation. So how long is your stream going to run for, Ed? What’s the plan? How will we tend to raise money? How will people, how can people donate, how can people get involved? What can we do? And then you pull out Rhy and Jack and I, in the meantime, what can we do to muster up support and engagement? What’s the plan?

Ed:
Well, I’m glad you asked. So the stream itself will be running well because the stream will be running as pretty much as long as people keep donating under like, you know, past certain thresholds depending on how much we, depending on how much we raise, you know, it’ll depend because my goal, my first goal for, donation goal is quite fairly low. And then so we’ll play it by, you know, how long it goes on for. But it could, it could go on for pretty much the whole weekend. It’d be like a, like a sort of 24 Hours of Le Mans kind of thing, but Mario Kart. But yeah, so in terms of people, how people can donate, there’s a link that I’ve set up for a Streamlabs page and all the money that is donated to that account goes straight to GenderGP. After this, after the stream has finished with receipts on my socials in terms of the actual donation centers themselves, if you’ll give me a second to get that up, actually.

Rhy Brignell:
Can we sort of put the message out there on Twitter and Instagram and things like that?

Dr Helen Webberley:
Yes. yeah, so I made a tweet a while ago about that kind of thing. Exactly. And it’s my pinned post on my Twitter. That’s @EdwardTSweet, the letter T not the word T. So you can share that around that’s got a link to the stream. Then I have got donation incentives that’s so you’ve got stuff like choose a particular character or a vehicle to go through races with, I got dramatic readings, I got karaoke, I got playing the next race one-handed.

Rhy Brignell:
Wow. That’s going to be hard.

Ed:
Among other things as well. Then I’ll be having guests on the show as well. Like obviously your esteemed selves.

Dr Helen Webberley:
We’ll be there most definitely. Yeah. Jack, Jack, how do you race on the line again? Just take us through, like how, how does it, how’s it actually going to happen? So if someone wants to come along and have a race, how many people, or how many characters are you allowed on the race? How do you actually join? If you know what I mean? How does it work?

Jack Webberley:
Is it Eight? Is it?

Ed:
Sorry that was 12. My mistake.

Jack Webberley:
Yeah, yeah. I think it’s simple. So I’m assuming you’re playing on Nintendo Switch, is it?

Ed:
Yes Switch.

Jack Webberley:
Yes. I think it’s literally as simple as just, they put their friend code in, add them as a friend and then invite them to a race and I think can have a total of 12 people in. So I thought a good donation insensitive could be like to challenge in the next race or something. So like, to be a part of the next big race if you donate and then you can, you can have 12 people in. And then it’s really simple if you have a Nintendo Switch it’s literally as simple as typing in a friend code.

Ed:
Exactly.

Jack Webberley:
So it’s really easy a platform and doing stuff like that.

Ed:
Yeah. So it’s a, if you’ve got a Switch and want to join in, then by all means you you’ll be able to take part.

Jack Webberley:
I have to teach my mom how to play first.

Dr Helen Webberley:
I’m definitely not doing the one-handed ones.

Rhy Brignell:
That’s definitely hard mode.

Jack Webberley:
(Unclear 15:30) as well.

Dr Helen Webberley:
I would start singing the tubes then (unclear 15:36). Rhy, you were talking about the COVID and people being locked away and being with the people like you. And it brought home to me, some, some moms and dads and teachers and grown ups out there worry that there’s this kind of influence, this LGBT influence. And that if you, if you joined an LGBT friendship, then you might be in some way influenced into that kind of identity. I wondered what your thoughts were on that, because you were kind of saying it’s just nice to be with other people like you. So I wonder what your thoughts were on that, really.

Rhy Brignell:
Yeah, for sure. I think that, yeah, I don’t see anything wrong in having a mixed friendship group. You know, like my friends historically, I mean, I’m 28, but my, my friends have always been a mixture of straight people and queer people and cis people and trans people. And there’s obviously nothing wrong with being exposed to people that are just different from you. I don’t, I don’t necessarily buy into this idea that, you know, being around LGBT people will make you LGBT.

Ed:
Like a sort of sinister contagion.

Rhy Brignell:
Yeah. Yeah. It’s not, it’s not quite how it works.

Ed:
In the midst of a pandemic, especially.

Rhy Brignell:
Yeah, exactly. But yeah, it’s important to have a diverse group of friends and yeah, I think that finding people that are different to you or people that are the same as you online is, is equally as valuable for the same reasons.

Ed:
I had a question from my partner who, because obviously, you know, there’s, there’s the (Unclear 17:11) does whether there’s some organization does work for trans people, but could you go into detail about like what the support, what support there is for nonbinary people looking to take a medical transition routes.

Rhy Brignell:
I can speak to the services we offer at GenderGP. We take on nonbinary patients and our, when we, when you sign up to him, a patient with us, we listen to the kind of goals that you might have for your treatment, whether that’s medical or wellbeing. And we have a team of specialist advisors and counselors and doctors that can advise you on the best steps to take and then would monitor your progress safely and provide feedback. Yeah, the services we provide are just as open to nonbinary people as they are to trans men and women.

Ed:
Thank you.

Rhy Brignell:
No problem.

Dr Helen Webberley:
I think that’s a really good point, Rhy. And you know, it can be difficult, isn’t it, to be inclusive, encompass everybody. But I think from what I’ve seen of GenderGP, and as I’ve watched it grow is that it doesn’t matter what gender you are. It doesn’t matter what gender you thought you were when you started. It doesn’t matter what gender you, how you identify now. It doesn’t matter if that changes, you know, because not everybody understands, completely understands their gender right from the beginning. And it doesn’t always exactly stay exactly the same. And then of course, there’s all the other people in the world who are supporting or living with a transgender person. And so I think, why shouldn’t GenderGP provide support for everybody? So it’s not just about giving medicine to trans kids. It’s about supporting families and supporting friends and supporting everybody that is touched by the matters that gender influences. And society, as we kind of mentioned, you mentioned it, I think at the beginning, society is not always the kindest to diverse people. And I think sometimes that support is really, really needed.

Rhy Brignell:
Especially it can be really hard as well as a nonbinary person to find the information that you need. Because you know, it’s, it’s not a very easy conversation to have with your GP who may have never even heard of nonbinary identities before, but yeah, as you said, GenderGP are accepting to all patients that have any gender identity and we’ll listen to the kinds of goals that you may have and help you achieve them no matter who you are or what they are.

Dr Helen Webberley:
Hope that answers the question, Ed.

Ed:
Thank you.

Dr Helen Webberley:
Jack, so you’ve, you’ve just started uni. Rhy you finished uni. What’s university life like in terms of acceptance and diversity and LGBT gender issues. Is it a comfortable place to be, or is it a bit tricky?

Jack Webberley:
I’d say from my experience that like my friends and all the people I’ve met through university are some of the most accepting people ever. No one – I’ve never met a single person that would ever hate on anyone like that. They would just be so accepting about who they are. It doesn’t even, it’s not even a question it’s like, Oh, you’re gay or you’re straight. It doesn’t matter. Everyone’s just, everyone’s friends everyone’s friendly and no one’s, no one’s going to be picking on other people for it and hating on other people. So I think especially, well, for me in Cardiff, I found that it’s been very good, very friendly people and just, yeah, just understanding and accepting of everyone and everything as it is. I don’t know if you’ve had the same experience, Rhy.

Rhy Brignell:
I was going to say, would you like my honest answer? So I mean, I’ve been part of academia for 10 years coming up now, and I technically am still enrolled cause I haven’t had my thesis in yet, my PhD, but I agree with Jack that you will find it’s just an absolutely amazing opportunity to find like-minded people and to find support networks. I am not the same person that I was three years ago when I started my post-graduate research as I am now. And that’s largely, largely to do with meeting other trans and gender nonconforming people and having the confidence to examine myself being inspired by the people who I’ve met. And so the students and the people around you, absolutely. The institutions themselves are still archaic and you will still encounter a kind of institutionalized prejudices in various forms. I’m happy to kind of, I won’t bore you all with the details now, but I’m happy to kind of talk about it maybe on a later podcast episode, but that doesn’t mean to say that the people that people around you won’t be supportive and that you won’t find the support networks that you need whilst you deal with these kinds of issues.

Ed:
Do you think it’s partly because of, cause obviously, you know, with a lot of people going out to uni, you know, there’ll be mainly you’re surrounded by obviously people moving out from home and feeling willing to sort of, you know, embrace like trying to explore more of themselves when they’re among sort of like-minded peers. And do you think there’s, but do you think the, on the flip side of that, do you think there’s, like you said that they set the institutionalized systems are still archaic. Do you think that’s says some sort of dichotomy between, between those institutions and then the mostly student led things like like LGBT societies, for example, I know lots of unis have them like mine did (Unclear 22:48).

Rhy Brignell:
Yeah, no, that’s, that’s exactly it. That the issues that you may face up to, no, you’re not coming from other students. It’s coming from perhaps tenured academics in the later years who are quite resistant to change who have always done things a certain way, have written, you know, their little bit of research and made their career off of that. And that, that can be a struggle. And academia as a whole is a very slow moving beast. It takes a very long time to effect change within it. So you just have to have patience and know that, you know, it’s not, you know, it’s not your peers and it’s not the students around you that are kind of in the way. It’s more just the slow moving nature of academia itself. That’s very resistant to change, but change is happening. We’re getting there. We’re fighting for it. So I have hope for the future.

Dr Helen Webberley:
That’s interesting that flavor goes across so many different streams, doesn’t it? You know, whether it’s the National Health Service that we often see that in. And we can hear Jack saying that students don’t got a problem with it at all, but the older, the decision-makers actually the policymakers are a little bit more stuck in their ways. You know, we see that, we see that over such a lot, but I think it isn’t it, I mean, that’s why something, something as I was going to say childish, but something is useful. Childish has, as gaming can, can really bring together people, communities. I often, when I was, when I was doctoring a few years ago, I often talked to young people and they would tell me how in their bedroom, behind their computer avatar, they could be whoever they wanted to be. And they could put your tray themselves and try out different looks and feel and costume and face and everything, different names. And it’s such a, such a rewarding place to try it all out, really. I mean, is that still the case?

Ed:
I think so. Yeah. Especially, especially on Twitch where, and other a streaming service where you’ve, you’ve been seeing content creators who present themselves through their characters. So for example, one that I can think of off the top of my head is CaseyExplosion. She, like, she presents herself through, through an online avatar. And that’s kind of that, that that’s her by like an identity through which she, she champions like social justice causes and does so much for marginalized communities and like activism.

Jack Webberley:
Like I completely agree with that as well. I have a lot of friends online who I’ve never met, never seen their face, just literally just know them through playing games and speaking to them. You play like stuff like genders that’s never been before. Anyone could just be exactly who they want to be. It’s not a problem. And everyone just sees each other as, as complete equals there’s no, no diverse, no like I don’t know what the word is, but yeah, the point I’m trying to make is everyone’s equal online, especially with my friends, stuff like that. And you can be exactly who you want to be. No questions asked. It doesn’t matter.

Rhy Brignell:
It can be a really useful way of exploring your identity in, from a position of relative safety before, you know, venturing out into the big wide world to see how it goes. You know, it’s a, it’s a way of trying things out for yourself and, you know, trying them on and seeing if they fit without yeah. Without, like you said, without facing necessarily any, any prejudice or intolerance.

Ed:
There’s still ways to go with that as well though. Like, cause obviously a lot of, a lot of the gaming scene is still quite toxic. I mean, if you’d go into like, you know, like the average comment section on like a, a video by, by a trans person or like the, the amount of harassment they they can still get, so.

Rhy Brignell:
I think yeah, like you had mentioned earlier that about the trans tag on switch, being a possibility. I would say that like that needs to come with good moderation from the platform itself. And that’s often something that we don’t see, for example, on Twitter, you know, you can receive some heinous transphobic tweets and handful of hate speech directed to you on Twitter is just like, well, this doesn’t go against our guidelines, we don’t care. And so we need to make sure that the platforms with which we operate have the robust guidelines in place so that we can report that kind of stuff and have it actioned.

Ed:
Yeah.

Dr Helen Webberley:
Is Twitch safe for that? So can, can anyone come on and comment or do you have to be invited? How does it, how does it work? Can you kind of get kicked off and blocked? Like you can get –

Jack Webberley:
You can.

Ed:
Yeah, yeah.

Jack Webberley:
You can ban people from your stream, but anyone can originally join.

Ed:
Yeah, yeah anyone can join. It’s just pretty much down to the mod team. You do still get, still get a lot of people who do throw around like slurs and in that thankfully, thankfully they’re a minority. But I mean, obviously, you know, as it says, as it says, (unclear 27:47) I don’t really get that. So, you know, I can only, I acknowledge that, you know, come from a place of privilege, but from what I’ve seen of others, you know, it is something that they have, they do deal with.

Dr Helen Webberley:
So do we need to put some things in place for for your live stream? Do we need to get some moderators and and I’ll ask for some help in that because we want this to be the most fun, engaging, inclusive, absolute, have a scream, and have a laugh. I don’t want any on that. Anyone on there has got anything to say other than well done for winning that race and you know, so do they need to do something, put something in place?

Ed:
I do have, I do have a team of mods ready. Yeah. Yeah. I don’t know how many, so how much traffic we’re going to get on that. So yeah. Maybe we need it, but I trust them all team I have at the moment.

Dr Helen Webberley:
Brilliant. Excellent. Okay. Cause I want people to come feeling, this is going to be a safe place to have fun for the Saturday or the weekend, whatever, whatever we do. So, so brilliant. Ed, you talked about the prizes and incentives. So have you got any further with that? What’s happening with that?

Ed:
Yeah, so, so we’re having two separate prize draws for that. So if you donate, it is based off total, total cumulative donations for the whole stream. So 40 pounds total gets you a big, like sort of perler beads, pattern, like pixel art kind of thing that you can put on your wall or what have you, obviously I’m, I’m having smaller ones as an immediate donation sense of, and then a larger prize draw, which you’ve very kindly put in place is donation, total donations of 150 pounds or more will get you the chance to win a coffee of Super Mario 3D World, the new rerelease on the Switch and as well as a Switch console.

Dr Helen Webberley:
Nice.

Ed:
The new limited edition Switch that’s coming out in three days, I think. So thank you so much for funding that.

Dr Helen Webberley:
No problem. Well Ed, I think all the things is to you for approaching GenderGP for setting this up. Keep in touch with us, let us know anything that we can do to help make this really, really fun, inclusive and just kind of, you know, we can’t go out to I’m going to sound (Unclear 30:29) we can’t go to a party or anything like that. So let’s go grown up adults who don’t believe in gaming, let’s put them away, lock them in their dining room away. (Unclear 30:40) They go. Let’s all come up together. Let’s have a really fun gaming day. I’m a big Mario fan, especially if I could be Peach. The pink peach I quite like, and I’m really, really grateful to you for organizing it. So I’m looking forward to, for an inclusive day, fun day gaming, chatting, and engaging.

 

Thank you so much for listening. I really hope you enjoyed our program today. Please go ahead and subscribe to future episodes if you haven’t done so already. If you or anyone else has been affected by any of the things that we talked about in our podcast today and would like to contact us, please visit our website Help Centre, and contact us via there. We’re very happy to accept ideas for future episodes and future guests. Do let us know if there is anything specific you’d like us to cover. You can also visit our website, gendergp.com, for a multitude of information about transgender health and wellbeing issues. You can follow us on social media, ID is @gendergp, and you can sign up to our monthly newsletter. Full details can be found in our show notes on our podcast page. Thanks for listening, and see you soon.